EP. 16-Inside the C-Suite with Corteva Agriscience's Tim Glenn

March 18, 2021

EP. 16-Inside the C-Suite with Corteva Agriscience's Tim Glenn

Mar 18, 2021

Planting season is almost here. So we’re digging in on the topic of agronomy this month, talking to the leaders of some of the world’s foremost providers of agriculture inputs.

 

In this episode of Wherever Jon May Roam, Jon catches up with Tim Glenn, the Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer at Corteva Agriscience, about how they’ve navigated the roller coaster of the last couple years, what new technologies they’re bringing to bear, and what kind of barbecue they cook up in Alabama. 

 

Tim has been in the ag inputs business with Corteva and its heritage organizations for 30 years, and shares insights to help growers maximize their productivity after a roller coaster couple of years in the ag business.

 

 

 

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Transcripts

 

Tim Glenn:

Twelve months ago, commodity markets were depressed, we had elevated stocks and we had a lot of market uncertainty. Things got to be very concerning about the health of our commodity markets and what the impact was going to be on our farmer customers, and the resiliency, how fast they bounced back was incredible.

 

Dusty Weis:

Hello and welcome to Wherever Jon May Roam, the National Corn Growers Association podcast. This is where leaders, growers, and stakeholders in the corn industry can turn for big-picture conversations about the state of the industry and its future. I'm Dusty Weis, and I'll be introducing your host, association CEO, Jon Doggett. You can join Jon every month as he travels the country on a mission to advocate for America's corn farmers. From the fields of the corn belt to the DC Beltway, we'll make sure that the growers who feed America have a say in the issues that are important to them with key leaders who are shaping the future of agriculture.

 

Dusty Weis:

Hard as it is to believe, it's that time of year again when planting is on the front burner, so here at the NCGA, we're digging in on the topic of agronomy this month, talking to the leaders of some of the world's foremost providers of agriculture inputs. In this episode, Jon catches up with Tim Glenn, the executive vice president and chief commercial officer at Corteva Agriscience, about how they've navigated the rollercoaster of the last couple of years, what new technologies they're bringing to bear and what kind of barbecue they cook up in Alabama. But if you haven't yet, make sure you're subscribed to this podcast in your favorite app. That way you can take us with you in your truck, your tractor, or on your next trip, and never miss an update from Jon. Also, make sure to follow the NCGA on twitter @NationalCorn and sign up for the National Corn Growers Association newsletter at ncga.com.

 

Dusty Weis:

With that, it's time to once again introduce Jon. Jon Doggett, the CEO of the National Corn Growers Association. Jon, here in the Midwest, it's what we like to call mud season. It's that wonderful time of year between when snow melts and when the grass starts growing, and we're just looking out at acres and acres and acres of mud. But for growers, this is the time of year when they start thinking about what they're going to plant in that mud and how they're going to protect that investment until harvest time.

 

Jon Doggett:

That's right, Dusty. And the decisions that growers are making right now, have been making for the last several months, that's going to stick with them for the rest of the year. So a lot of interest in what those decisions are going to be and how they're going to be implemented, but here at NCGA, we're going to put an extra focus on agronomy this month, with not one but two podcast episodes, talking to the leaders of the two biggest input producers in the world of agriculture. Our conversation today is with Tim Glenn, the executive vice president and chief commercial officer at Corteva Agriscience. Tim, thanks for joining us.

 

Tim Glenn:

Thanks, Jon. Great to be with you today.

 

Jon Doggett:

So Tim, you've amassed nearly 30 years of experience in the world of agriculture inputs. Tell us a little bit about your background. We talked before we hit the record button a little bit about a certain football team that you follow, but tell us about that, and how did you come to lead Corteva today?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, over the course of my career, I've never really imagined myself ever working in any industry other than agriculture. From my decision to go to Iowa State and major in agriculture during the depths of the 1980s farm crisis, all the way through my entire working life, it's been my focus. Certainly early interest came from my family and specifically on my father's side of the family, but it's been something that I was drawn to early, and again, I could never imagine working any place else. I spent my career in sales, marketing, and business leadership roles and a couple of years leading our seed production group as well. And as you say, I'm in my 30th year with Corteva, and really proud to have had the experiences over that 30 years that have given me a great perspective on our industry, both here from a US perspective, but also on a global basis.

 

Tim Glenn:

I think I'm a little bit unique in my background because I talk about 30th year with Corteva. Corteva is a new company that just came together, and I actually had the opportunity to work in all parts of our heritage organization. So I started my career in Pioneer, and spent my first six years there. I actually spent nine years with Dow AgroSciences, and then came back to work in Pioneer. And then finally, my last role in DuPont was as the leader for the crop protection business in DuPont, and that led us up to the time of the merge between Dow and DuPont. So I had this heritage of this experience of working in all parts of the organization, and now to be a part of the largest US-based seed and crop protection company, with 100% focus on agriculture is really special. And to be able to lead the commercial organization, that's focused on working with farmers and channel partners around the world, I generally say I have the best job in the company.

 

Jon Doggett:

You didn't mention football though.

 

Tim Glenn:

No, I'm blessed because I grew up in Alabama and, and grew up a Crimson Tide fan, and certainly for the last 13 or 14 seasons, it's never been a better time to be an Alabama fan, and then having gone to Iowa State and spent a lot of my career living in Iowa, like I do right now, I've stayed very close to the Iowa State program, and we're coming off our best season ever. So two top-10 teams as my focus and that's great. I won't talk about my pro team because the Minnesota Vikings let me down this past year.

 

Jon Doggett:

Well, I live in the Washington DC area, and we don't have professional sports here, so you're lucky.

 

Tim Glenn:

Understand.

 

Jon Doggett:

Yeah. So relationship building is everything in agriculture, and certainly Corteva has proved to be a very important partner for us at NCGA. You're on our Ag-Industry Council, you are very generous in your support for our corn Yield Contest with your Pioneer brand. And you folks really stepped up as a partner with us on Commodity Classic this year, and we really, really appreciate that. So tell me, why is it important for a company like yours to support commodity organizations?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, I think the fact that you are farmer led, no one understands the challenges and needs of our farmer customers better than you. Who else is there better to be closely associated with? And you represent growers interest on issues like trade and policy, and really are a powerful spokesperson for the industry, with media and government officials. So we value our relationship very much with NCGA, and other grower groups as well. We want to continue to work together to advocate for policies that support the success of US farmers, and we will do that on our own, and we'll certainly do it in conjunction with you.

 

Tim Glenn:

I think the thing that I will emphasize is that no one can underestimate the impact of a farmer's voice on issues. And you collectively, as that industry voice, representing corn growers is incredibly impactful. We'll go out there and we can speak on our own behalf, but at the end of the day, industry has less impact than a couple of farmer voices do on issues around policy. So we really do appreciate your leadership and your role of developing grower leaders that are strong spokespersons for our industry, especially as we've worked together through the global pandemic and obviously just wrapping up a virtual Commodity Classic, and a very successful event at that, I believe.

 

Tim Glenn:

And the Yield Contest, you mentioned that, and I'll just say that it's something that we put a lot of pride in, not just because our customers end up winning a lot of contests, but it really is an opportunity to demonstrate what the capabilities are of the genetics that we're putting out there, and the management skills of the farmers. So, while not every farmer is able to replicate those contest yields, what it does do is create that challenge to think about how we can try new tools and practices, so that we can continue to improve year after year. That's why we take a lot of pride in that. And certainly it's fun every year, when we see farmers reach those new yield thresholds.

 

Jon Doggett:

So Tim, I have to ask because it's so different from what most people experience in their life, but what's it like leading a Fortune 500 company like Corteva?

 

Tim Glenn:

I can tell you when I was starting in this business, like I said, I couldn't imagine ever working any place other than agriculture, but I also couldn't imagine ever being in a senior leadership role, like I am today as part of a corporation like Corteva, but it is exciting. It's exciting because I get to work with some of the best people in the world. We're having a positive impact on agriculture every day, and we have 20,000 people in Corteva, who are 100% focused on the needs of our farmer customers.

 

Tim Glenn:

While we're a big organization and certainly it maybe hard for everyone to get their head around what it's like to be a part of a team of 20,000, at the end of the day, it's people who are deeply committed to this industry, have strong roots in agriculture and strong relationships back to the farm today. So we're going to continue to rely on those strong relationships and our great teams to help move forward. But it is a lot of fun. The thing that has never changed over the course of my career is the fact that every day we get to go out there and impact the livelihood of producers around the world, and there's nothing that gets you more motivated than that.

 

Dusty Weis:

Tim, leading an organization like Corteva during good times is probably enough of a challenge. But if you look back at the last year that we've been through the pandemic, COVID-19, social distancing, everything being uprooted the way that it was, how do you go about leading an organization like Corteva through something like that? What have you learned as an organization and how has it made you better, would you say?

 

Tim Glenn:

It was something that, and we're right at that one-year mark from when things really did change for society. We had drills and practices and preparations for different things, and certainly pandemic was one of those items that we had talked about, but until you go through it, all the preparation in the world really isn't real until you actually have to implement.

 

Tim Glenn:

First of all, we had to make sure that safety was our top priority at the start and all the way through the pandemic, especially as we were learning what this meant, and it was the safety of our customers, safety of our employees and all the stakeholders that we operated with. And of course, we had to adapt. You think about when it broke here in the US, that first, second week of March, we were well on our way towards preparing for planting and all the things that our customers were counting on, so we had to make sure that we never lost sight of our farmer customers and that we were continuing to be able to meet their needs through that entire process.

 

Tim Glenn:

I'm very proud that despite the incredible headwinds and the challenges, our teams continued to deliver, whether it was being there to answer a customer's needs, making sure that the product was there on time and our supply chains and practices really held up well through that. As we continued on, obviously we were working more virtually internally, but also with our farmer customers as well. So we've been implementing digital tools for some time, and I think what COVID forced all of us to do is really accelerate the timing of that, and so we began to have virtual interactions with our customers that maybe in the past we never would have, and what we found was that we probably touched growers that we would not have been able to. They were able to participate or join events, and farmers who maybe in the past were very reluctant to use technology, all of a sudden they embraced it as well.

 

Tim Glenn:

So that's going to carry forward and we'll learn about that. We needed to make sure that they were comfortable and even a thing as simple as a seed delivery, that was typically a very manual process. Somebody shows up at the farm and you're signing a document. That's all been digitized today. So if a customer is less comfortable meeting face-to-face, we have e-commerce solutions that enable that strong relationship to continue, but do it in a way that's more comfortable from a customer perspective. So we're still in the field, we've never backed down, but we're doing things a little bit differently, and our customers have adapted, and as I said, I'm really proud that I don't think we ever missed their expectations through the course of the past year.

 

Jon Doggett:

So Tim, what's the most surprising thing about the pandemic and everything that we've been through the last 12 months, both for you personally and for Corteva as a company?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, I think probably the most... Maybe it's not such a surprising thing, but something I'm really proud of is just how quickly we all adapted to the challenge, and then we took it on and then we moved forward. That's inherent in agriculture. We deal with things and we figure out ways to overcome, and that resiliency. 12 months ago, if we would have been talking, we were probably in a situation where our commodity markets were depressed, we had elevated stocks and we had a lot of market uncertainty. Certainly COVID accelerated that, and when you think about ethanol markets being disrupted and feed markets and trade, things got to be very concerning about the health of our commodity markets and what the impact was going to be on our farmer customers, and the resiliency, how fast they bounced back was incredible. Certainly, due to increased demand and some production challenges that happened in different parts of the world in 2020, we've seen a commodity run-up that's created a lot more optimism as we go forward.

 

Tim Glenn:

So, the resiliency and the ups and downs, if you sit back and look at what we dealt with over the course of the year, really incredible. I think one other thing I'd pass out there is that I think we all got a little creative in terms of how we develop solutions, and I'll share something that we did at Corteva. The technology we use to develop products is cutting-edge technology, and what we found is that here in Johnston, Iowa, our laboratory technology fit very well with COVID testing. And when you think about the early stages of the pandemic, and we couldn't run enough tests to necessarily decide who was or wasn't at risk, we brought on a capability, and over the course of the year, we've been able to provide a significant amount of the capacity in the state of Iowa on our site here in Corteva for COVID testing.

 

Tim Glenn:

We collaborated with hospitals and other healthcare organizations to bring that on, got an approval. Even yesterday, I'm traveling this weekend to go see my parents in Alabama, and I did a COVID test at the office, and it was collected and completed there on site, and it took about four hours for me to get my result back. That's something that, through all the preparations, you could never have imagined, but it also shows the science and technology that we utilize in agriculture and how it can have an impact, even beyond developing the next great corn hybrid or soybean variety.

 

Jon Doggett:

It's truly amazing how quickly people across the country in agriculture and outside of agriculture have embraced this technology, and Zoom has entered our nomenclature, and I finally realized here, about two weeks ago that our growers really have embraced this Zoom technology, when one of the older growers I was on a Zoom call with, had to remind me to take myself off mute. So when you reach that point, you know this is going to work pretty good.

 

Jon Doggett:

We've reached a point where people are getting their COVID vaccines, and we hope that they are getting their COVID vaccines. We cannot encourage you strongly enough, get your vaccine. But Tim, is it too soon to start feeling optimistic about the future again? As you're looking forward to the year ahead of us in agriculture, what are your expectations for the season and the year, and what's just on the immediate horizon?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, I'm an optimist by nature. I probably wouldn't have lasted 30 years in this industry if I wasn't an optimist, given the uncertainty that we can deal with on a year-to-year basis. It's also one of my favorite times of the year, because we're in that stage where we're getting ready to unleash this machine and we're going to go plant 90 plus million acres of corn and another 90 million acres of soybeans, maybe, so it's easy to get excited about what's going on as we sit here today.

 

Tim Glenn:

The good news is, Dusty, while it may be muddy outside there, field conditions are actually pretty nice here in Iowa, and we've had a good run of warm weather and we're past the mud stage here. So we just need to make sure we're closing the window on cold and wet from this point forward.

 

Dusty Weis:

I'm jealous.

 

Tim Glenn:

Yeah. As I look forward, clearly the rebound of the commodity prices, as I mentioned is a big deal. And I think a year ago, it was easy to be pessimistic about how long was it going to take to work through some of the high carryover stocks that we were seeing on a global basis, and we moved through that really fast and so much better positioned there. I think again the resilience for demanding commodities versus the lows of last year, the ethanol, we're not quite back to where we were before, but it's gotten closer. And certainly, some of the scary things we were seeing where we weren't sure if our livestock producers were going to be able to process animals and what exports, how that might flow. That's gotten back to normal.

 

Tim Glenn:

I think the other part is the fact that we've been through this now, and we've been through a full cycle of this, the ups and the downs and the challenges, and we've proven that we can work in new ways, so that's really exciting. The other part is I'm always excited because, every year we get to bring out some new piece of technology, and our customers are always wanting to know what's that next great product that we're going to bring, and we've got tremendous products like Enlist E3 soybeans and Qrome corn hybrids. Our brands, both Pioneer and Brevant are doing well, and just the pipeline, being able to get those products back out there in the field and demonstrate the performance is really exciting. So it's very easy for me to be optimistic this time of year.

 

Jon Doggett:

Well, anytime I talk to somebody in the seed industry, there's always a lot of enthusiasm, and gosh, you just take a look at where that seed technology has gone over the last few years. Tim, what would you say are some of the most important advances in seed technology and how have they improved growers margins?

 

Tim Glenn:

It's an incredible journey, and I will mention that this year, we're marking the 95th anniversary for the Pioneer brand. So Henry Wallace founded this company 95 years ago, and we were the innovators that introduced hybrid seed corn into the market. So it's a really exciting year for us just because it is a milestone, but we've been at this for a long time as well. And the things over the course of my career, what I've seen is trend yields back in the late '80s were in the low 120s, and as we sit here, a little over 30 years later, trend yields are in the 170s. By the way, we're doing that on 20% more acres than we were back then, so just that productivity, it's not just what you see, it's what you actually feel in terms of our results.

 

Tim Glenn:

Clearly, how we develop new seed products has completely changed over the course of my career. We've brought automation, we've brought digital technology into the product development, and so the pace of change, the speed of technology is just incredible. And along with the rate of gain that we've been able to increase, the probability of success of new hybrids and varieties is much greater when we introduce them, because we know so much more about the genetics we're developing today.

 

Tim Glenn:

The other thing I would highlight is management practices that farmers are using have continued to improve, whether it's from tillage to improvements across the board from an agronomic standpoint, farmers are able to get more out of that seed and do it in a more sustainable way. Then finally, all this has really been enabled by some new digital technologies. My perspective has always been that farmers are able to make improvements when they can manage details. It's those discreet decisions that they make and how they act upon them that are really important. And today, farmers have more data than they've ever had, and they're in a position to act upon that data and do it in every decision, so they can get the most out of their inputs throughout the season. I believe we're still on the front edge of what's possible in agriculture, so while we've seen, yields continue to improve over the course of history, we're going to see that continue forward, and technology is going to move forward at a faster pace.

 

Tim Glenn:

We're investing in building our capabilities that deliver new products and services and information that are going to support farmers' needs, driving productivity and sustainability going forward, and we're doing it as we strengthen our core plant breeding capabilities, biotechnology, crop protection. We're also doing it as we partner with others across the value chain. We're going to partner with our traditional folks in agriculture, but there's also folks outside of agriculture bringing technology and ideas that are going to be really important. So we've made tremendous progress, but that progress doesn't stop and we're going to continue to press on, and I believe continue to accelerate that pace again in the future.

 

Jon Doggett:

Well, Tim Glenn, the executive vice president, chief commercial officer at Corteva, what's on the horizon? What's in the pipeline for the next five to 10 years?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, we're committed to research and bringing new technology to market, and that's really what our customers expect, so we've got a full slate of technology. On the crop protection side, we got new formulations and active ingredients that deal with the difficult pests that our customers are always faced with. I'd say that a trend that's coming in that space is that we're really focused on continuing to develop products that are for more natural sources and are considered to be more environmentally sustainable products. I would also expect over the next number of years, that you're going to see more impact from biological products that will compliment our traditional products or potentially bring new solutions to our customers.

 

Tim Glenn:

The journey to continue to bring next-generation hybrids and varieties is never over, and so much like I talked about bringing the Enlist weed control system into the market, we're going to continue to bring those new products and new biotechnology traits that not only bring new functionality and value, but also sustain some of the improvements we have, so next-generation corn rootworm traits, as an example, to deal with the long-term risk around resistance.

 

Tim Glenn:

Certainly as we come forward, digital offerings are more important every year, and we know that customers are still in, call it the early stages of adopting and realizing value. But we're focused on bringing digital technology that will allow them to make better decisions and get the most value out of the products that we're bringing to them. It's a never-ending journey to develop new products, and obviously continuing to develop new and better practices in conjunction with our farmer customers is important. So agronomy is always going to be critical, and as we have new questions that come up around carbon and new opportunities that may be in front of our customers, we want to be partnering with them to help make sure that they're making the best decisions possible.

 

Jon Doggett:

So we've had a number of discussions at NCGA about what's the farmer going to look like in 10, 20, 30, 40 years, and how do we stay relevant as an organization as that next generation, and the one after that takes over the farm? What are you doing at Corteva to stay relevant?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, clearly, as long as I've been around, we've always talked about next-generation producers and we've gone through a long run of consolidation, and no reason to think that we won't continue to have bigger, more sophisticated operations that we'll be working with. We stay close to our farmer customers, and it's their feedback and input that really drives it.

 

Tim Glenn:

I think also going forward, we've got to stay close to consumers and maybe more closely connected up and down the value chain, and that is something that's changed a lot. I think that the voices about what we're doing and how we're operating within agriculture are going to continue to be very strong, and we don't have the freedom or the ability just to bury our head and ignore it. So I think the farmer customers who are willing to connect up and down the value chain is going to be important. Farmers who will be willing to continue to change and evolve are going to be critical, and obviously, we're focused on bringing solutions that support those long-term trends that we're facing around biologicals and digital technologies, and helping them get the most out of their nitrogen decisions as well. So it's a never-ending journey, and staying close to the customer and also staying close to consumers is going to be really critical.

 

Jon Doggett:

Do you have any advice for us at NCGA in our efforts to stay relevant?

 

Tim Glenn:

I think you all do a great job of representing corn farmers here in the US, and also have an international impact as well. And clearly for any one of us, we got to stay focused on the issues that are important to our farmer customers and whether that's trade and market access, clearly that's a global issue. There's only a handful of countries in the world that have the ability to produce an export of this crop, and so making sure that we have good market access for our products on a global basis is absolutely critical. When you think about technology and making sure that technologies are accessible to our customers, not just in terms of approvals here, but approvals around the world, and we really appreciate collaboration with you all to ensure that we've got technology accessibility around the world.

 

Tim Glenn:

Also, I would say, just making sure we have sound policies, whether it's coming out of Washington DC, or other bodies that impact our customers, and ranging from the Farm Bill or to anything else that can create opportunities or potentially derail what's happening with our customers. So staying close and representing their interests and needs, and I think also being a beacon in helping communicate back as well is important. Farmers are very independent, and while we have tens of thousands of corn growers who may come together, they also are making decisions independently, and I think that you can also be a tremendous source of information and insight for them as well, as they structure their operations and think about where they go in the future.

 

Jon Doggett:

Well, we at NCGA represent corn farmers here in the US, but we work with international organizations and partners a lot. What are you hearing from farmers that you support around the globe in terms of challenges that they're facing?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, a lot of the challenges are the same, and in my job, I get to work with some of the most sophisticated farmers around the world. There's a lot more similarities than differences when it comes right down to it. They have similar concerns, it's about market access, it's about being able to ensure that the products that they're producing are going to be accepted and have free access to markets. So to me, that is absolutely critical. While we will compete with certain markets, when we think about sheriff trade and things like that here in the US, the fact is that the world needs all that we're producing today and whether it's corn or soybeans or other commodities. So it is really important that we have that competition for share of market, but we also respect the fact that we're all a part of the solution in terms of providing feed and fuel for the world. So that to me is absolutely critical.

 

Tim Glenn:

I would also say that on a global basis, that question around the consumer connection is really important and making sure that we continue to build that bridge, and also that from an agricultural standpoint, that we advocate and educate what we're doing in a very transparent and collaborative way. I don't think agriculture should be confrontational or adversarial with outside voices. I think we have a real opportunity to do it in a more collaborative way here in the US and around the world.

 

Jon Doggett:

We have a great story to tell, and we just need to keep telling it, and telling it, and telling it, and we need to let the farmer voice be at the front of that discussion over and over again.

 

Tim Glenn:

And the farmer voice is the most credible voice, absolutely the most credible voice.

 

Jon Doggett:

I had that conversation with one of our grower leaders just this morning, and I've been around agriculture all my life so far, but I'm not an active farmer, and that voice is really, really, really important. So that's one of the things we do, and one of the things we're going to continue to do. Tim, last year was a rollercoaster, but let's not forget 2019 was a rollercoaster too. We've had two pretty tough years back to back, but I'm pretty optimistic. What gets you excited about the future of corn and your company's role in that future?

 

Tim Glenn:

Well, as I said, it's easy for me to get excited because I see what the future can hold, and I'm excited that the technology that we're bringing will help us to continue to push the limit on what's possible, and whether it's through top-end yields or the impact we can have in terms of sustainable practices, I'm pretty excited about the Yield Contest winners, whether it was David Hula reaching 600 bushels a couple of years ago, or thresholds that were reached this year. Again, while not every producer needs to be setting that as their benchmark, there's things that David does year after year, that allows him to continue to raise the bar that I think every producer can do. I'm also really excited about the opportunity to help bridge the divide that has been emerging between consumers and farmers, and really help society understand the importance of farming and agriculture. And certainly corn here in the US is as important as any crop we have, and should be at the front and center of that conversation we have with consumers.

 

Jon Doggett:

It was about a year ago that we were all learning how to do Zoom calls. I had never been on a Zoom call before March, and I didn't know what Zoom was. So this is one of our favorite questions here. If you could Zoombomb anyone, Zoombomb being another new word, just show up unexpectedly on a Zoom call with somebody, who would it be and why?

 

Tim Glenn:

That's a great question. Maybe some of the people who are most important in the history of our company, that would be interesting, if you put some of our founders on a Zoom call and how would they do things differently? Whether it's from Henry Wallace, who founded Pioneer in 1926, or some of the great leaders who I learned from as I joined the organization, we all think we're so smart or so modern, or do things so well, but I would be interested to see how those folks who didn't live in the technology-enabled world that we have today, how would they handle things? One of the great things about our company is we have legendary people who came in front of us, who helped make it all possible, and I have enormous amount of respect for them and it would be great to learn some lessons from them in a modern context.

 

Jon Doggett:

All right. Tim, I'm going to give you one last opportunity to get yourself in trouble.

 

Tim Glenn:

All right.

 

Jon Doggett:

What's the best barbecue place in the great state of Alabama?

 

Tim Glenn:

If I'm going to a game in Tuscaloosa, just out of tradition, you got to go to Dreamland. I know a lot of people would argue whether that's the best one or not, but that would be probably a game day tradition for us. If I'm visiting my parents in Foley, Alabama, I would say Moe's Original, which is very close by. I'd say it's not necessarily a spectacular barbecue, but it's the place where my parents really like to go. They don't go out a lot anymore, older, but my dad always gets a smile when we have that, and I was already thinking, as I go down there next week, that on Monday evening, I know exactly what he's going to order and I'm going to take him to Moe's for some barbecue.

 

Jon Doggett:

And what kind of sauce?

 

Tim Glenn:

I'm not a sauce guy, so-

 

Jon Doggett:

Oh, okay. This is good to know.

 

Tim Glenn:

If I do any sauce, I might do some spicy, but I'm generally not a sauce guy.

 

Jon Doggett:

All right.

 

Tim Glenn:

So if you make the meat well enough, you don't need the sauce.

 

Jon Doggett:

Tim Glenn, the executive vice president and chief commercial officer at Corteva Agriscience. Thank you so much for joining us on the NCGA podcast. I'm Jon Doggett, I'm the CEO of the National Corn Growers Association. Thanks for listening and tune in again soon for another episode of Wherever Jon May Roam, the NCGA podcast.

 

Dusty Weis:

That is going to wrap up this edition of Wherever Jon May Roam, the National Corn Growers Association podcast. New episodes arrive monthly, so make sure to subscribe on your favorite app and join us again soon. Visit ncga.com to learn more, or sign up for the association's email newsletter. Wherever Jon May Roam is brought to you by the National Corn Growers Association, and produced by Podcamp Media, branded podcast production for businesses, podcampmedia.com. For the National Corn Growers Association, thanks for listening. I'm Dusty Weis.

 

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